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The Call

Little did I know when the Lord told me He would show me His people through His eyes that I was one of those people, that I would be shown not only by seeing as an observer but as partaker as well. And He too is a partaker of the sufferings of His people. “I am hurting, I am hurting!” He said to me. I know too well the pain, the death and hell we must all face, the iniquity we must be shown in ourselves and be purged of by fires. I have identified and do identify with His people. I just did not think, though I surely believed I was His, that I was, by nature, a partaker of all the sins and vanities of His people and therefore a partaker of the fruits of them as well.

When the Lord shows one something, He shows him not by mere observation but subjection. Only then do we know and understand and relate.

One day while praying quite dignified, I was forced to be relieved,

And in an old cabin the Lord signified what in me He had conceived.

I will show you My people by My eyes, their suffering and sorrow you’ll see;

They live in weeping and gnashing and cries but proclaim that they are free.

 

In their stoves burns no fire to give them heat, the wind blows through the walls;

From broken glasses and plates they eat, and off its hinges the front door falls.

Their power is void while idols abound; vain professions are on their tongue;

No floor ‘neath their feet covers the ground, their possessions are no more than dung.

 

These are His people the Lord lets me see, people for whom He does hurt;

His desire for them is that they be free, raised up to the sky from the dirt.

“A critic you are,” said one man to me; I didn’t like the thought,

But now a critic I know I must be though for this I have not sought.

 

Truth I desire in my innermost being, not only for me but for others,

But Satan comes and keeps them from seeing and life in their hearts he smothers.

Yet one day will come when all evil will fail from this world in Christ;

The righteous will be the head, not the tail, when they’ve come to their sacred tryst.

Prince Albert, 1976

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